French Sabbatical

My family's year in France…

Day 210 (26 January 2011) – The Dessert Sisters

Father forgive me. I have a problem similar to one many young American students have, the one having to do with confusing the spelling of desert and dessert. Well, actually, I can do that just fine in English. In fact, I can do it just fine in French (get this, it’s “désert” and “dessert”). My problem has to do with PRONOUNCING the two words in French. Apparently, I often am referring to the hot, sandy place when what I really want is some kind of delicious French chocolate pudding… If I could, I’d try some funny way to demonstrate the sound of the two words but I just don’t think Mr T can pronounce them correctly, either.

Now that I’ve made my confession I can move on.

Wednesday afternoons could be a nice family affair over the next couple of months. As you may remember, Ella gets out of school at noon for the day. And now Chloe, who resumed classes at the University of Nantes on Monday, also gets out at noon on Wednesdays. To celebrate the occasion today, we went into town for a family lunch. The girls enjoyed pizzas. By the way, Chloe loves the thin European crust while Ella is adjusting (she misses Zeke’s in our neighborhood back home in Seattle). And it’s interesting that pizzas are brought to your table unsliced, just a plate of uncut pizza. The girls also ordered dessert (the sweet treat, not the hot, sandy place). No surprise there. What was surprising is they (read: Chloe) let me take their picture to post on the blog.

PS – One more confession. At lunch today I wanted to order a bottle of bubbly water, Pellegrino, in fact. On the menu they listed two choices, 50cl and 100cl. Since Chloe wanted some, too, I thought I’d order the 100cl bottle. The server kind of giggled at me after I ordered and then explained that what I actually requested was 100 bottles. Thankfully, she only brought one. That didn’t stop the girls from singing 100 bottles of Pellegrino on the wall…

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January 26, 2011 - Posted by | Uncategorized

2 Comments »

  1. Just remember: 2 s’s make an s sound, but one s sounds like a z.

    Simple, no?

    Comment by Judy | January 27, 2011 | Reply

    • Yes, it’s simple, of course. 😉 But then there are all these other sounds from the other words in a sentence. Some words even begin with R. Ah, I’m giving it my best shot. Nice to hear from you. I hope you are getting a vicarious chuckle, or even a real chuckle, out of my French language experience.

      Comment by Andy Smallman | January 27, 2011 | Reply


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